Fact sheets contain statistical information on coronial cases. If you or someone you care for is in need of assistance, support services are available.

The NCIS releases fact sheets on coronial data held in the collection. Fact sheets include statistical information on deaths reported to a coroner and cover specific topics of public interest. Fact sheets are intended to support the work of death investigators and researchers. The NCIS does not provide further comment on the facts sheets.

Explanatory notes provide more information on data sources and limitations. For detailed information on any topic below, request a data report

NCIS data is used for research and policy development by government agencies and other organisations. For reporting on other key topics, see research

Any reproduction or reporting of intentional self-harm data contained in these fact sheets should consider the Mindframe guidelines (External link) regarding reporting of suicide.

 

Mortality data series

The NCIS Mortality data series examines closed case external cause deaths reported to Australian and New Zealand coroners. The series is published annually and provides yearly data to enable comparisons over time.

Australia

Deaths due to injury, drug contribution and intentional self-harm on a calendar year basis.

 

New Zealand

Deaths due to injury and drug contribution on a calendar year basis.

From the 2019 series onwards, the intentional self-harm fact sheet is no longer published as part of the New Zealand Mortality data series. Information about suicide in New Zealand can be found at the New Zealand Ministry of Health (External link) website.

 

Intentional self-harm series

Intentional self-harm deaths among specific populations. Fact sheets in this series are produced for Australian data only.

 

Intentional self-harm deaths of farmers and farm workers in Australia

The wellbeing of farmers and farm workers is essential for maintaining Australia’s agricultural sector. However, these workers face a variety of environmental, economic and social issues that impact their suicide risk.

Fact sheet - FS22-09 - Intentional self-harm deaths of farmers and farm workers in Australia (PDF, 177.12 KB) (External link)

 

Intentional self-harm deaths of health professionals in Australia

Health professionals are employed across a variety of occupations and settings within the health workforce, with over 700,000 health professionals employed throughout Australia. Their work can involve considerable exposure to stress and trauma, and some occupations within this workforce are at elevated risk of suicide.

Fact sheet - FS21-09 - Intentional self-harm deaths of health professionals in Australia (PDF, 332.54 KB) (External link)

 

Intentional self-harm deaths of emergency services personnel in Australia

There are over 105,000 emergency services personnel employed in an operational or non-operational capacity across the police, ambulance and fire services throughout Australia. Emergency services personnel work to protect the safety of the community. This work involves routine exposure to stress and trauma.

Fact sheet - FS19-02 - Intentional self-harm deaths of emergency services personnel in Australia (PDF, 152.31 KB) (External link)

 

Intentional self-harm deaths of young persons in Australia

Intentional self-harm was the 14th leading cause of death in Australia and the leading cause of death for people aged 15-24 years in 2018.

Fact sheet - FS20-06 - Intentional self-harm deaths of younger persons in Australia (PDF, 236.21 KB) (External link)

 

Intentional self-harm deaths of older persons in Australia

Intentional self-harm is the 13th leading cause of death in Australia. In 2017, 3,128 people died from an act of intentional self-harm in Australia. While the highest frequency of intentional self-harm fatalities occurs among middle aged persons, rates among older persons remain high. 

Fact sheet - FS19-01 - Intentional self-harm deaths of older persons in Australia (PDF, 223.45 KB) (External link)

 

Common interest series

Deaths by other categories of common interest.

Australia

 

Residential fire-related deaths in Australia

Deaths that result from residential fires have significant social, economic and emotional impacts - not only on individuals, but on the wider community and emergency service workers who respond to these incidents. Individuals' circumstances, behaviours, residential environments and other external factors impact the risk of a fatal fire

Fact sheet - FS22-08 - Residential fire-related deaths in Australia (PDF, 112.89 KB) (External link)

 

Benzodiazepine-related deaths in Australia

Benzodiazepines are prescription drugs that have depressant and minor tranquilliser effects. Benzodiazepines can be harmful if misused or combined with alcohol or other drugs.

Fact sheet - FS22-01 - Benzodiazepine-related deaths in Australia (PDF, 379.33 KB) (External link)

 

Household maintenance-related deaths in Australia

Household maintenance is a common activity in Australian homes, but poses significant potential risks to health and safety.

Fact sheet - FS21-08 - Household maintenance-related deaths in Australia (PDF, 248.11 KB) (External link)

 

Opioid-related deaths in Australia

Opioids include medications used for pain relief and illicit drugs, such as heroin. Opioids can be harmful if misused or combined with other central nervous system depressants.

Fact sheet - FS21-01 - Opioid-related deaths in Australia (PDF, 380.13 KB) (External link)

 

Injury deaths by residential remoteness area in Australia

Remoteness areas divide Australia into five classes of remoteness based on a measure of relative access to services. The majority of Australia’s population reside in major cities. Those living in non-metropolitan areas have shorter life expectancies, higher levels of injury and less access to health services than their counterparts in major cities.

Fact sheet - FS20-07 - Injury deaths by residential remoteness area in Australia (PDF, 146.02 KB) (External link)

 

Sport and recreation deaths in Australia

Sport and physical recreation are popular in the Australian community, and participation in these activities contributes positively to health and well being. However, these activities involve risks which may result in injury – or even death. In 2016-17 alone, 58,500 people were hospitalised for sports injuries in Australia.

Fact sheet - FS20-05 - Sport and recreation deaths in Australia (PDF, 619.31 KB) (External link)

 

Animal-related deaths in Australia

Australia has a reputation for being home to some of the world’s most dangerous animals. Thousands of hospital admissions are attributable to contact with bees, hornets, wasps, spiders, snakes, ticks, ants and marine animals each year in Australia. However, deaths as a result of these interactions remain relatively rare, particularly in comparison to deaths associated with other species.

Fact sheet - FS20-01 - Animal-related deaths in Australia (PDF, 204.98 KB) (External link)

 

New Zealand

 

Sport and recreation deaths in New Zealand

Sport and physical recreation is popular in New Zealand, with the majority of adults participating in such activities every week. New Zealand is also a leading adventure tourism destination, attracting increasing numbers of adventurous visitors from around the globe. However, these activities involve risks which may result in injury – or even death – particularly when those activities are undertaken independently.

Fact sheet - FS22-10 - Sport and recreation deaths in New Zealand (PDF, 445.66 KB) (External link)

 

Copyright

Content is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0), unless otherwise stated. Attribution must be provided to the National Coronial Information System (NCIS).

Support services

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